The Human Resource Professionals Career Guide: Building a Position of Strength


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In , Craig C. Lundberg defined the concept in "Planning the Executive Development Program". It has since been popularized by Richard Boyatzis and many others, such as T. Gilbert who used the concept in relationship to performance improvement. Its use varies widely, which leads to considerable misunderstanding. Some scholars see "competence" as a combination of practical and theoretical knowledge , cognitive skills , behavior and values used to improve performance; or as the state or quality of being adequately or well qualified, having the ability to perform a specific role.

For instance, management competency might include systems thinking and emotional intelligence , and skills in influence and negotiation. Studies on competency indicate that competency covers a very complicated and extensive concept, and different scientists have different definitions of competency. In , Zemek conducted a study on the definition of competence. He interviewed several specialists in the field of training to evaluate carefully what makes competence.

After the interviews, he concluded: "There is no clear and unique agreement about what makes competency. Competency is also used as a more general description of the requirements of human beings in organizations and communities. If someone is able to do required tasks at the target level of proficiency, they are "competent" in that area.

Competency is sometimes thought of as being shown in action in a situation and context that might be different the next time a person has to act.

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In emergencies, competent people may react to a situation following behaviors they have previously found to succeed. To be competent a person would need to be able to interpret the situation in the context and to have a repertoire of possible actions to take and have trained in the possible actions in the repertoire, if this is relevant. Regardless of training, competency would grow through experience and the extent of an individual's capacity to learn and adapt.

However, research has found that it is not easy to assess competencies and competence development [2]. Competency has different meanings, and remains one of the most diffuse terms in the management development sector, and the organizational and occupational literature. Competencies are also what people need to be successful in their jobs.

Job competencies are not the same as job task. This set of context-specific qualities is correlated with superior job performance and can be used as a standard against which to measure job performance as well as to develop, recruit, and hire employees. Competencies and competency models may be applicable to all employees in an organization or they may be position specific. Identifying employee competencies can contribute to improved organizational performance.

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An organizational core competency is its strategic strength. Competencies provide organizations with a way to define in behavioral terms what it is that people need to do to produce the results that the organization desires, in a way that is in keep with its culture. By having competencies defined in the organization, it allows employees to know what they need to be productive. When properly defined, competencies, allows organizations to evaluate the extent to which behaviors employees are demonstrating and where they may be lacking. For competencies where employees are lacking, they can learn.

This will allow organizations to know potentially what resources they may need to help the employee develop and learn those competencies.


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Competencies can distinguish and differentiate your organization from your competitors. While two organizations may be alike in financial results, the way in which the results were achieve could be different based on the competencies that fit their particular strategy and organizational culture. Lastly, competencies can provide a structured model that can be used to integrate management practices throughout the organization.

Competencies that align their recruiting, performance management, training and development and reward practices to reinforce key behaviors that the organization values.


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Dreyfus and Dreyfus [4] introduced nomenclature for the levels of competence in competency development. The causative reasoning of such a language of levels of competency may be seen in their paper on Calculative Rationality titled, "From Socrates to Expert Systems: The Limits and Dangers of Calculative Rationality". The process of competency development is a lifelong series of doing and reflecting. As competencies apply to careers as well as jobs, lifelong competency development is linked with personal development as a management concept.

And it requires a special environment, where the rules are necessary in order to introduce novices, but people at a more advanced level of competency will systematically break the rules if the situations requires it. This environment is synonymously described using terms such as learning organization , knowledge creation, self-organizing and empowerment. Within a specific organization or professional community, professional competency is frequently valued. They are usually the same competencies that must be demonstrated in a job interview.

But today there is another way of looking at it: that there are general areas of occupational competency required to retain a post, or earn a promotion. For all organizations and communities there is a set of primary tasks that competent people have to contribute to all the time. For a university student, for example, the primary tasks could be:.

The Occupational Competency movement was initiated by David McClelland in the s with a view to moving away from traditional attempts to describe competency in terms of knowledge , skills and attitudes and to focus instead on the specific self-image, values, traits, and motive dispositions i. Different competencies predict outstanding performance in different roles, and that there is a limited number of competencies that predict outstanding performance in any given job or role. Thus, a trait that is a "competency" for one job might not predict outstanding performance in a different role.

There is hence research on competencies needed in specific jobs or contexts. Nevertheless, there have been developments in research relating to the nature, development, and assessment of high-level competencies in homes, schools, and workplaces. The most recent definition has been formalized by Javier Perez-Capdevila in , who has written that the competences are fusions obtained from the complete mixture of the fuzzy sets of aptitudes and attitudes possessed by employees, both in a general and singular way.

Instead of the typical chronological progression of your background, I recommend doing a SWOT analysis within the context of a professional interview.

6 Key Qualities of an HR Manager | Concordia University, St. Paul Online

Analyze the sector, the company, and the job function using a SWOT and look for opportunities to market yourself. I go into this in more detail in my blog post on how to tell your professional story in a way that will entice an interviewer to hire you. Sample Answer: I have been a sales manager for X years, with experiences that include being able to lead a sales force toward the accomplishment of aggressive goals. Prior to that, I worked at X where I completed X, etc.

Side note: figure out the assets of the hiring firm or its needs and tailor your response accordingly. HR managers ask this question to determine if there are any red flags related to your departure. Are you leaving on good terms or bad? Are you looking to escape from your current job or grow within a new one? Sample Answer : My business unit started with 50 full-time employees and today it has While this reduction in personnel enabled me to showcase my ability to produce results with limited resources in an organization where management has turned over, I am interested in transitioning to an organization like yours where there is growth potential.

For example, in my current role I managed to acquire K clients with only one other sales manager and a dwindling budget. How we treat the patient is part of the patient's treatment. Technical competencies: Depending on the position, both technical and performance capabilities should be weighed carefully as employment decisions are made. For example, organizations that tend to hire or promote solely on the basis of technical skills, i. Behavioral competencies: Individual performance competencies are more specific than organizational competencies and capabilities.

As such, it is important that they be defined in a measurable behavioral context in order to validate applicability and the degree of expertise e. Functional competencies: Functional competencies are job-specific competencies that drive proven high-performance, quality results for a given position.

They are often technical or operational in nature e. Unlike leadership characteristics, management characteristics can be learned and developed with the proper training and resources. Competencies in this category should demonstrate pertinent behaviors for management to be effective. Plans work and carries out tasks without detailed instructions; makes constructive suggestions; prepares for problems or opportunities in advance; undertakes additional responsibilities; responds to situations as they arise with minimal supervision; creates novel solutions to problems; evaluates new technology as potential solutions to existing problems.

Makes sound decisions; bases decisions on fact rather than emotion; analyzes problems skillfully; uses logic to reach solutions. Works harmoniously with others to get a job done; responds positively to instructions and procedures; able to work well with staff, co-workers, peers and managers; shares critical information with everyone involved in a project; works effectively on projects that cross functional lines; helps to set a tone of cooperation within the work group and across groups; coordinates own work with others; seeks opinions; values working relationships; when appropriate facilitates discussion before decision-making process is complete.

Maintains high standards despite pressing deadlines; does work right the first time; corrects own errors; regularly produces accurate, thorough, professional work. Personally responsible; completes work in a timely, consistent manner; works hours necessary to complete assigned work; is regularly present and punctual; arrives prepared for work; is committed to doing the best job possible; keeps commitments. Demonstrates knowledge of techniques, skills, equipment, procedures and materials. Applies knowledge to identify issues and internal problems; works to develop additional technical knowledge and skills.

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Produces an appropriate quantity of work; does not get bogged down in unnecessary detail; able to manage multiple projects; able to determine project urgency in a meaningful and practical way; organizes and schedules people and tasks. Writes and speaks effectively, using conventions proper to the situation; states own opinions clearly and concisely; demonstrates openness and honesty; listens well during meetings and feedback sessions; explains reasoning behind own opinions; asks others for their opinions and feedback; asks questions to ensure understanding; exercises a professional approach with others using all appropriate tools of communication; uses consideration and tact when offering opinions.

Anticipates problems; sees how a problem and its solution will affect other units; gathers information before making decisions; weighs alternatives against objectives and arrives at reasonable decisions; adapts well to changing priorities, deadlines and directions; works to eliminate all processes which do not add value; is willing to take action, even under pressure, criticism or tight deadlines; takes informed risks; recognizes and accurately evaluates the signs of a problem; analyzes current procedures for possible improvements; notifies supervisor of problems in a timely manner.

Is alert in a high-risk environment; follows detailed procedures and ensures accuracy in documentation and data; carefully monitors gauges, instruments or processes; concentrates on routine work details; organizes and maintains a system of records. Remains open-minded and changes opinions on the basis of new information; performs a wide variety of tasks and changes focus quickly as demands change; manages transitions from task to task effectively; adapts to varying customer needs. Able to manage multiple projects; able to determine project urgency in a practical way; uses goals to guide actions; creates detailed action plans; organizes and schedules people and tasks effectively.

Establishes high standards and measures; is able to maintain high standards despite pressing deadlines; does work right the first time and inspects work for flaws; tests new methods thoroughly; considers excellence a fundamental priority.

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Responds to requests for service in a timely and thorough manner; does what is necessary to ensure customer satisfaction; prioritizes customer needs; follows up to evaluate customer satisfaction. Able to challenge conventional practices; adapts established methods for new uses; pursues ongoing system improvement; creates novel solutions to problems; evaluates new technology as potential solutions to existing problems. Able to become a role model for the team and lead from the front.

https://europeschool.com.ua/profiles/pyfoteja/paginas-para-buscar-parejas-en.php Reliable and have the capacity to motivate subordinates. Solves problems and takes important decisions.


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  • Many Human Resource professionals are employing a competitive competency model to strengthen nearly every facet of talent management—from recruiting and performance management, to training and development, to succession planning and more. A job competency model is a comprehensive, behaviorally based job description that both potential and current employees and their managers can use to measure and manage performance and establish development plans.

    Often there is an accompanying visual representative competency profile as well see, job profile template. Creating a competency framework is critical for both employee and system success.

    The Human Resource Professionals Career Guide: Building a Position of Strength The Human Resource Professionals Career Guide: Building a Position of Strength
    The Human Resource Professionals Career Guide: Building a Position of Strength The Human Resource Professionals Career Guide: Building a Position of Strength
    The Human Resource Professionals Career Guide: Building a Position of Strength The Human Resource Professionals Career Guide: Building a Position of Strength
    The Human Resource Professionals Career Guide: Building a Position of Strength The Human Resource Professionals Career Guide: Building a Position of Strength
    The Human Resource Professionals Career Guide: Building a Position of Strength The Human Resource Professionals Career Guide: Building a Position of Strength

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